There is a relatively new technique in self-publishing that I’m going to try.  The big idea is to create  an online course, then produce a book indirectly from that course. Many authors have done this successfully and end up with a book faster and have more stuff to sell.

It works like this:

1. Create your course.  This is a bunch of PowerPoints and screen sharing like we see in Active Shooter.
2. Record your course using Camtasia.
3. Send the resulting videos to a transcription service, like rev.com, for $1/minute.  The resulting text is the draft of your book
4. Edit the draft into a book
5. Strip off the audio of your course into an audio book.

End result.  You now have a book, audio book, and a course to upsell.  Plus, if it’s a how-to book, you also can upsell your consulting. Now you have the makings of a profitable business.

Some authors have cranked out a book in two weeks using this method and found it was a much better product.

Why?  Because starting out in a teaching mode forces you to simplify, then just say the essential bits to communicate your point.  Limiting yourself to high level bullet points forces you to really hit the main points.  It’s a form of outlining.  Also, many people like reading stuff that sounds like you’re talking to them.  In this case, they are.

First time authors tend to spend a year doing a brain dump of everything they know.  And yet when you ask them to teach a 2-hour class with a specific result for the student in mind, they get much more focused.

Plus, with today’s self-publishing, its better to write shorter series of books, than one gigantic tome of everything the author knows.

So, start with a course.  If it sells, turn it into a book, which you can use to promote your course through a free+shipping funnel. This seems like a great way to jumpstart your author value ladder.


Mark Houston Smith
Mark Houston Smith

Founder of High Value Publishing. Follow me: Website / Twitter / Facebook

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